DANIELE CASCONE

"ART HAS ALWAYS HAD A DOUBLE NATURE; IT IS BORN AS AN INTIMATE AND SELFISH ACT, BUT IT NEEDS TO GET NAKED AND BE SHARED WITH AS WIDE AN AUDIENCE AS POSSIBLE."

Daniele Cascone (Born 1977) is from Ragusa, Italy. He began his artistic career in 2001. Experimenting a lot, mixing digital techniques with more traditional instruments, he is interested in photography and stop-motion video.  His work led him to initiate several projects on the visual arts, including the web magazine "Brain Twisting."  At the same time, he began to exhibit both in Italy and abroad and his works are in numerous industry publications.

"Art must upset me and make me stop thinking."


In late 2008, the photographic medium became predominant in his work, for which he uses the studio sets where to enact situations that characterize his works.
Daniele Cascone is in constant search for a balance between creative impulse and technical execution, necessary to explore themes such as man, existence, the subconscious and symbolism.

Daniele Cascone offers us an intriguing way to see life.  A way to be mesmerized by the shape of the human body that is often accompanied by an inanimate object, and the energy that emanates from these two forms merges into one allowing you to see far more than you asked for.  You see a past entangled in a present that nears a future.  You see light in the darkest hour -depicting a harsh reality that somehow, we all have experienced.  Through his art, you engulf yourself in a moment where all is nothing, and nothing is all, where you are exposed to a contradiction that simply makes sense and just becomes a whole.   

Q. What is the role of the artist in society?
A.
 To sensitize the minds, create connections, to communicate with the spirit of our times.


Q. What is your best childhood memory?
A.
 I have confused memories of my childhood. I cannot identify the precise, only moments of generic events. I recall with pleasure the many outdoor games with friends or while being alone, at home, with Lego bricks.

Q. As a child, what did you want to be when you grew up?
A.
 I dreamed of becoming a construction engineer to build houses. Other times, to be a scientist. Today, I carry out none of these roles.

Q. Do you remember the first art you made? What was it and how old were you?
A.
 I have drawn and painted since childhood. I've always had an obsession with images. However, it is difficult to determine when I made "art" if I had ever managed. I can talk about a greater awareness reached in 2004, at twenty-seven.

Q. How and when did you seriously become interested in art?
A.
 When I was fifteen, I started to explore many topics, from cinema to painting. Then the interest has grown and today, I devoured it daily.

Q. Tell us about your particular style and how you got there?
A.
 I started with anything. I was passionate about digital art and computer graphics, and for years I have made experiments of any type, developing different styles. Then came photography and there has been a radical revolution. It came after a period of crisis and failures, where I questioned everything I had done. It was the style, in a sense, to find me and not vice versa.

Q. How do you see the threads of your work?
A.
 Project is the detail of my work, but much is given to improvisation and changes of direction. Sometimes I cannot find the way forward, so I start from the beginning. Other times I see something on which to insist and develop ideas. There is no rule or a recipe, I just have to figure out when it is appropriate to rely on instinct and when I have to stop and think.

Q. What do you aim to express with your art?
A.
 Innermost thoughts and unconsciousness, confusing symbols, chaos and order. However, for some years now I have the need to express absolute nothingness.

Q. What personality trait has gotten you in the most trouble?
A.
 I am introverted and stubborn. I cannot say that I put in some kind of trouble, but sometimes these sides of my character are counterproductive in an environment like that of art. I'm not a good promoter of my work.

Q. What did you have to sacrifice for this career?
A.
 Time, lots of time spent locked up in the studio.


Q. What are your biggest influences? Are you inspired by the work of your colleagues or anyone else in particular?
A.
 I am often inspired by the authors who work with the human figure and go beyond the simple representation of an individual. I like it when I sense a work of questions, contradictions, of concerns, provocations that lead me to reflect and be reflected, somehow, in them.

Q. Is the artistic life lonely? What do you do to counteract it?
A
. It is lonely (and should be) when you create. Outside the studio, like everyone, I need to relate to others.


Q. Aside from art, what do you like to do?
A.
 Traveling, reading, writing, playing sports in the outdoors.

Q. What is your philosophy about art?
A.
 I cannot give a definition of art. I only know that if I stand in front of something that starts from the bottom, with the base a torment that gives me a jolt, then I think I'm in front of a work of art.

Q. What does "success" mean to you?
A.
 Being able to involve as many people to be reflected in my work.


Q. What are the biggest things you've learned in life so far?
A.
 To have real relationships with others: share, discuss, help each other. A simple concept but difficult to implement.

Q. What is the best advice you were given and by whom?
A.
 I receive many tips and opinions, but I have one in particular suitable for framing.

Q. What advice would you give to the next generation?
A.
 To be intellectually honest, to express themselves without limitations or fears.

 
  • Facebook

AR[ T ]MOIRE